SPECIALIST IN TREATING IBD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory Bowel Disease describes inflammatory disorders affecting the gut. There are several types but the two most common and well known are Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory Bowel Disease describes inflammatory disorders affecting the gut. There are several types but the two most common and well known are Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s Disease is a chronic, or long-term, condition that causes inflammation of the digestive system. Although it can affect any part of the digestive system, it is most commonly found in the terminal ileum which is the last section of the small intestine and / or in the colon or large intestine.

People can live with Crohn’s Disease for long periods with no or very mild symptoms that range from fatigue, diarrhoea, blood in the stools and abdominal pain. However, a common feature of Crohn’s Disease are flare-ups. During these periods, you may experience a worsening of your symptoms, as well as loss of appetite, weight loss, and fever. People can suffer problems in other parts of the body as a result of the inflammation, including arthritis, red and swollen skin, mouth ulcers and eye irritation.

Crohn’s can affect people at any age, although occurs most frequently between the ages of 16 and 30. The exact cause is unknown, but it is thought to be linked to factors such as genetics, smoking, environmental factors and problems with the immune system of the gut.

Treatment depends on the severity of your condition and the symptoms you’re experiencing. Mr Michael Stellakis may recommend medical therapies, such as steroids or biological therapies. Generally the medical treatment of Crohn’s is managed by a gastroenterologist to whom Mr Stellakis may refer you. Surgical options are used if medical management fails though drug treatments have advanced considerably over the last few years making surgery less likely.

Crohn's Disease Treatment
Crohn's Disease Treatment

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s Disease is a chronic, or long-term, condition that causes inflammation of the digestive system. Although it can affect any part of the digestive system, it is most commonly found in the terminal ileum which is the last section of the small intestine and / or in the colon or large intestine.

People can live with Crohn’s Disease for long periods with no or very mild symptoms that range from fatigue, diarrhoea, blood in the stools and abdominal pain. However, a common feature of Crohn’s Disease are flare-ups. During these periods, you may experience a worsening of your symptoms, as well as loss of appetite, weight loss, and fever. People can suffer problems in other parts of the body as a result of the inflammation, including arthritis, red and swollen skin, mouth ulcers and eye irritation.

Crohn’s can affect people at any age, although occurs most frequently between the ages of 16 and 30. The exact cause is unknown, but it is thought to be linked to factors such as genetics, smoking, environmental factors and problems with the immune system of the gut.

Treatment depends on the severity of your condition and the symptoms you’re experiencing. Mr Michael Stellakis may recommend medical therapies, such as steroids or biological therapies. Generally the medical treatment of Crohn’s is managed by a gastroenterologist to whom Mr Stellakis may refer you. Surgical options are used if medical management fails though drug treatments have advanced considerably over the last few years making surgery less likely.

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis is a chronic or long-term condition that produces inflammation in the  lining of the colon and rectum. Typically inflammation with small ulcers develop in the colon’s lining, which can bleed.

Symptoms vary depending on the degree of inflammation. For some people, these symptoms can be quite mild, whereas for others they can have a profound impact on daily living. They include fatigue, abdominal pain, frequent diarrhoea and, like with Crohn’s, the inflammation can cause problems in other parts of the body, such as arthritis, mouth ulcers and eye and skin irritation.

Ulcerative Colitis can develop at any age but is most commonly diagnosed between the ages of 15 to 25. The exact causes are unknown but linked factors include genetics, gut immunity  and environmental factors.

Medication includes steroids and biological therapies and surgery may also be advised.

If you have had UC for longer than 10 years you maybe asked to undergo more regular colonic surveillance using colonoscopy because your risk of bowel cancer increases with active UC the longer you have it. If you need a colonoscopy Mr Stellakis can perform this for you at The Nuffield or The New Foscote Hospital.

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis is a chronic or long-term condition that produces inflammation in the  lining of the colon and rectum. Typically inflammation with small ulcers develop in the colon’s lining, which can bleed.

Symptoms vary depending on the degree of inflammation. For some people, these symptoms can be quite mild, whereas for others they can have a profound impact on daily living. They include fatigue, abdominal pain, frequent diarrhoea and, like with Crohn’s, the inflammation can cause problems in other parts of the body, such as arthritis, mouth ulcers and eye and skin irritation.

Ulcerative Colitis can develop at any age but is most commonly diagnosed between the ages of 15 to 25. The exact causes are unknown but linked factors include genetics, gut immunity  and environmental factors.

Medication includes steroids and biological therapies and surgery may also be advised.

If you have had UC for longer than 10 years you maybe asked to undergo more regular colonic surveillance using colonoscopy because your risk of bowel cancer increases with active UC the longer you have it. If you need a colonoscopy Mr Stellakis can perform this for you at The Nuffield or The New Foscote Hospital.